Overview

  • Product nameAnti-beta V Tubulin antibody
    See all beta V Tubulin primary antibodies
  • Description
    Mouse polyclonal to beta V Tubulin
  • Tested applicationsSuitable for: WBmore details
  • Species reactivity
    Reacts with: Human
    Predicted to work with: Mouse, Rat, Cow, Xenopus laevis, Chimpanzee, Zebrafish, Rhesus monkey, Chinese Hamster, Orangutan
  • Immunogen

    Recombinant fragment corresponding to Human beta V Tubulin aa 6-106.
    Sequence:

    HIQAGQCGNQIGAKFWEVISDEHGIDPTGTYHGDSDLQLDRISVYYNEAT GGKYVPRAILVDLEPGTMDSVRSGPFGQIFRPDNFVFGQSGAGNNWAKGH


    Database link: P07437

  • General notes


    This antibody was raised by a genetic immunization technique. Genetic immunization can be used to generate antibodies by directly delivering antigen-coding DNA into the animal, rather than injecting a protein or peptide (Tang et al. PubMed: 1545867; Chambers and Johnston PubMed 12910245; Barry and Johnston PubMed: 9234514). The animal's cells produce the protein, which stimulates the animal's immune system to produce antibodies against that particular protein. A vector coding for a partial fusion protein was used for genetic immunisation of a mouse and the resulting serum was tested in Western blot against an E.coli lysate containing that partial fusion protein. Genetic immunization offers enormous advantages over the traditional protein-based immunization method. DNA is faster, cheaper and easier to produce and can be produced by standard techniques readily amenable to automation. Furthermore, the antibodies generated by genetic immunization are usually of superior quality with regard to specificity, affinity and recognizing the native protein.

Properties

  • FormLiquid
  • Storage instructionsShipped at 4°C. Store at -20°C. Stable for 12 months at -20°C.
  • Storage bufferPreservative: None
    Constituents: 50% Glycerol, Whole serum.
  • PurityWhole antiserum
  • Primary antibody notesThis antibody was raised by a genetic immunization technique. Genetic immunization can be used to generate antibodies by directly delivering antigen-coding DNA into the animal, rather than injecting a protein or peptide (Tang et al. PubMed: 1545867; Chambers and Johnston PubMed 12910245; Barry and Johnston PubMed: 9234514). The animal's cells produce the protein, which stimulates the animal's immune system to produce antibodies against that particular protein. A vector coding for a partial fusion protein was used for genetic immunisation of a mouse and the resulting serum was tested in Western blot against an E.coli lysate containing that partial fusion protein. Genetic immunization offers enormous advantages over the traditional protein-based immunization method. DNA is faster, cheaper and easier to produce and can be produced by standard techniques readily amenable to automation. Furthermore, the antibodies generated by genetic immunization are usually of superior quality with regard to specificity, affinity and recognizing the native protein.
  • ClonalityPolyclonal
  • IsotypeIgG
  • Research areas

Applications

Our Abpromise guarantee covers the use of ab52837 in the following tested applications.

The application notes include recommended starting dilutions; optimal dilutions/concentrations should be determined by the end user.

Application Abreviews Notes
WB 1/1000. Predicted molecular weight: 49 kDa.

Target

  • FunctionTubulin is the major constituent of microtubules. It binds two moles of GTP, one at an exchangeable site on the beta chain and one at a non-exchangeable site on the alpha chain.
  • Tissue specificityUbiquitously expressed with highest levels in spleen, thymus and immature brain.
  • Sequence similaritiesBelongs to the tubulin family.
  • DomainThe highly acidic C-terminal region may bind cations such as calcium.
  • Post-translational
    modifications
    Some glutamate residues at the C-terminus are polyglutamylated. This modification occurs exclusively on glutamate residues and results in polyglutamate chains on the gamma-carboxyl group. Also monoglycylated but not polyglycylated due to the absence of functional TTLL10 in human. Monoglycylation is mainly limited to tubulin incorporated into axonemes (cilia and flagella) whereas glutamylation is prevalent in neuronal cells, centrioles, axonemes, and the mitotic spindle. Both modifications can coexist on the same protein on adjacent residues, and lowering glycylation levels increases polyglutamylation, and reciprocally. The precise function of such modifications is still unclear but they regulate the assembly and dynamics of axonemal microtubules.
  • Cellular localizationCytoplasm > cytoskeleton.
  • Information by UniProt
  • Database links
  • Alternative names
    • beta 4 tubulin antibody
    • Beta 5 tubulin antibody
    • beta Ib tubulin antibody
    • M40 antibody
    • TBB5_HUMAN antibody
    • TUBB antibody
    • TUBB1 antibody
    • TUBB5 antibody
    • tubulin beta 1 chain antibody
    • Tubulin beta 5 chain antibody
    • Tubulin beta antibody
    • Tubulin beta chain antibody
    • tubulin beta polypeptide antibody
    • Tubulin beta-5 chain antibody
    see all

References for Anti-beta V Tubulin antibody (ab52837)

ab52837 has not yet been referenced specifically in any publications.

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Please note: All products are "FOR RESEARCH USE ONLY AND ARE NOT INTENDED FOR DIAGNOSTIC OR THERAPEUTIC USE"