All tags Cancer Targeting VEGF for therapeutics

Targeting VEGF for therapeutics

Achieve the goals of your VEGF research with our flexible and tailored product offering and custom services.

Although successful in some cases, the current VEGF pathway-targeting drugs in oncology – VEGF/VEGFR-2 neutralizing antibodies and signaling blockers – have limitations. The benefits of these treatments are often only modest, with some cancers being resistant to them1,2.

Efforts to improve VEGF pathway-targeting drugs and combine them with other drugs are underway. A better appreciation of the mechanisms of action of these drugs and the development of new biomarkers for patient stratification will be key to success1,2.

How we can help you

By providing you with a flexible and tailored approach via our custom services and a secure source of research tools, we can help you achieve the goals of your VEGF research programs.


Flexible antibody formulations. Our antibodies to  VEGF and related pathways are available in PBS only (BSA and azide free) and directly conjugated with a selection of fluorophores or reporters. See all options for our rabbit monoclonal to VEGFA.

Large amounts and consistency of supply. Secure the supply of your favorite products.

Custom antibody services to generate rabbit monoclonal antibodies to your targets of choice, using our patented RabMAb® technology. Read more.

Simultaneously profile multiple miRNAs of your choice in the VEGF network with our Firefly® particle technology. We offer custom miRNA panel design to provide you with a solution tailored to your needs. Learn more.

A complete range of VEGF and angiogenesis products, with antibody arrays for the simultaneous detection of up to 60  angiogenesis factors, a wide selection of small molecule inhibitors to target VEGF/VEGRs and related signaling pathways, and much more.

If you don’t find what you need please contact us, our expert customer service will help you with your specific request.


References

1. Ferrara N. VEGF as a therapeutic target in cancer. Oncology. 3, 11-6 (2005)

2. Jayson GC, Kerbel R, Ellis LM, Harris AL. Antiangiogenic therapy in oncology: current status and future directions. Lancet. 388, 518-29 (2016).

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