The neurobiology of pain and itch

Start date
April 10, 2014
End date
April 11, 2014
Venue
Laurel Heights Auditorium
Location
San Francisco
Topics

-Molecular heterogeneity of the primary afferent: a target for pain therapy
-Unraveling the dorsal horn circuits that transmit pain messages
-Distinguishing the neural circuits that cause itch from those that cause pain
-Imaging the brain: where pain and itch percepts are ultimately generated

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Program Announced 

 

There is still time to submit a poster abstract 
Registration will close April 4, 2014

Already registered and need to submit an abstract? Email events@abcam.com indicating the meeting you are registered for, and attach your abstract. The events team will be happy to attach your abstract to your registration.

 

Meeting Chairs: 

Allan Basbaum (UCSF, US) and David Julius (UCSF, US) have announced this meeting to take place in San Francisco in Spring 2014. 

Meeting Location:

Laurel Heights Auditorium 
3333 California Street
San Francisco, CA, 94143 

Description

It does seem that there is always one more pain or itch meeting to attend, so why have we organized yet another? Our objective is to bring together a diverse group of outstanding scientists who are unraveling the intricacies of the circuits that process pain and itch and who are working on research questions where the biggest breakthroughs in our understanding of basic biology of pain and itch will derive.  

On the one hand the focus is broad, as reflected in the title of the meeting:  “The Neurobiology of Pain and Itch”, covering molecular mechanisms that operate at the level of the nociceptor, circuitry in the spinal cord dorsal horn, parallels and differences in the processing of pain and itch at the level of the dorsal horn and finally, imaging studies of the brain that hopefully address questions concerning the extent to which pain and itch messages remain segregated as they are transmitted from the periphery to the spinal cord to the brain. On the other hand, every effort will be made to seek common principles that operate at the different levels of the nervous system where pain and itch messages are processed.

The format of the meeting is simple. On two consecutive days, we will have four sessions that address the following topics, with three speakers per session.  Each of the speakers is internationally recognized in their area of research.  Below is the final program of keynote speakers:

Topics to be covered:

Molecular heterogeneity of the primary afferent: a target for pain therapy

  • Sulayman Dib-Hajj     Yale University
  • Patrick Mantyh            University of Arizona
  • Greg Scherrer              Stanford University

Unraveling the dorsal horn circuits that transmit pain messages

  • Rohini Kuner              University of Heidelberg
  • Quifu Ma                    Harvard University
  • Uli Zeilhofer               University of Zurich

Distinguishing the neural circuits that cause itch from those that cause pain

  • Diana Bautista            University of California Berkeley
  • Mark Hoon                 National Institutes of Health
  • Sarah Ross                  University of Pittsburgh

Imaging the brain: where pain and itch percepts are ultimately generated  

  • Catherine Bushnell      National Institutes of Health
  • Petra Schweinhardt      McGill University
  • Thomas Tölle              Technical University of Munich

In addition to these keynote presentations, there will be several short platform presentations (about 15 minutes each) chosen from submissions.  Finally, those topics not chosen for short platform presentations are invited to present their findings in poster sessions that will run on both days of the meeting. We anticipate an attendance of about 150, which is sufficiently small to allow for considerable interchange of questions and ideas.  There will be ample time for discussion and a perhaps some excellent California wine to encourage the interchange.