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Immune cell markers poster

We highlight the best markers for immunophenotyping human and mouse immune cells, compiled from over 250 references.

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  • Easily select myeloid and lymphoid lineage-specific markers as well as markers of hematopoietic progenitor and stem cells
  • Choose markers for both human and mouse immune cells
  • Markers common to different cell types are also provided for easy depletion of cell groups in your experiments

Get a PDF version of the poster here

The immune system consists of many different cell types, whose functions and interactions govern the immune response. In research, the specific composition of cell surface antigens is exploited to accurately define the different cell types. Immunophenotyping by flow cytometry has become the most commonly used method to identify, quantify, and isolate immune cells within mixed populations. However, selecting which antigens are best to identify a specific cell type can be challenging due to the vast number of research articles and very little consensus on immunophenotyping panels.

In response to this, we have carefully reviewed and cross-referenced over 250 research articles focused on the study of human and mouse immune cells. We have compiled the most commonly used markers to identify each of the different cell types in the immune system. With this selection you can easily build your own immunophenotyping panel and dedicate more of your time to research.

Markers of immune cells

Many immune cell markers are named following the clusters of differentiation (CD) nomenclature, which aims to provide targets for cell immunophenotyping. The table below summarizes the CD markers we have selected for the identification and quantification of human and mouse immune cells. For each of these CD markers, we strive to provide antibodies tested in several applications to guarantee sensitivity and specificity.

As an example, you can see data corresponding to western blot (WB), immunocytochemistry (ICC), immunohistochemistry (IHC), and flow cytometry testing of our RabMAb® antibody against integrin alpha 5 (CD49e).

Anti-Integrin alpha 5 (CD49e) antibody [EPR7854] (ab150361). A: WB analysis of ab150361 in human bladder (lane 1), HT-1080 (lane 2), HeLa (lane 3), and U937 (lane 4) cell lysates. B: immunofluorescent analysis of ab150361 (green) in U937 cells. The nuclear counterstain is DAPI (blue). C: immunohistochemical analysis of ab150361 in Human kidney tissue. D: overlay histogram showing HeLa cells stained with ab150361 (red line). Isotype control antibody (black line) and unlabelled sample (blue line) were used as controls. For further details on the methodology, please review the datasheet.

Get a PDF version of the poster here

Human

Cell typeMarkersReferences
HSCCD34+, CD38-, CD45RA-, CD49+, CD90/Thy1+1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6
MPPCD34+, CD38-, CD45RA-, CD90/Thy1-3, 7, 8, 6, 9
CLPCD34+, CD38+, CD10+, CD45RA+10, 3
CMPCD34+, CD38+, CD7-, CD10-, CD45RA-, CD90/Thy1-, CD135+9, 7, 11, 12
MEPCD34+, CD38+, CD7-, CD10-, CD45RA-, CD135-, IL3Rα-7, 13, 14, 11, 12
GMPCD34+, CD38+, CD10-, CD45RA+, CD123+, CD135+7, 14, 15, 11, 12
NK Cell*CD3-, CD56+, CD94+, NKp46+16, 17, 18, 19, 20
T Cell*CD3+21, 22, 20
B Cell*CD19+23, 24, 25, 20, 26
Monocyte*CD14+14, 27, 26
Macrophage*CD11b+, CD68+, CD163+28, 29
Dendritic Cell*CD11c+, HLA-DR+30, 14
NeutrophilCD11b+, CD16+, CD18+, CD32+, CD44+, CD55+31, 32, 33, 20, 26
EosinophilCD45+, CD125+, CD193+, F4/80+, Siglec-8+14, 34, 35, 36, 20
BasophilCD19-, CD22+, CD45low, CD123+14, 37, 38, 20
Mast CellCD32+, CD33+, CD117+, CD203c+, FcεRI+39, 40, 41
ErythrocyteCD235a+42, 26
MegakaryocyteCD41b+, CD42a+, CD42b+, CD61+14, 13, 43
PlateletCD41+, CD42a+, CD42b+, CD61+20, 44

* The markers selected for these cell types are common to all subsets (eg T cell markers are common to killer, helper and regulatory T cells).

Markers are accompanied with “+” or a “–” symbol to indicate whether the specific cell type expresses (+) or lacks (-) the antigen (eg CD10+ indicates a cell type expressing CD10). In some cases, markers are accompanied with “high” or “low”, indicating different degrees of expression.

Mouse

Cell typeMarkerReferences
LT-HSCSca-1+, CD117+, CD34-, CD48-, CD49blow, CD135-, CD150+45, 46, 47, 5, 48, 49, 11
IT-HSCSca-1+, CD117+, CD34-, CD49high, CD135-, CD150+11, 50, 51, 46
ST-HSCSca-1+, CD117+, CD34+, CD48-, CD135-, CD150-52, 4, 53, 54
MPPSca-1+, CD117+, CD34+, CD48-, CD135+11, 55, 52
LMPPSca-1+, CD117+, CD34+, CD127+, CD135+11, 56, 57
CLPSca-1+, CD117+, CD93+, CD127+, CD135+11, 58, 10, 59
CMPCD117+, CD16/32-, CD34+, CD41+, Sca-1-56, 11, 4, 57
GMPCD117+, CD16/32+, CD34+, CD64+, Sca-1-11, 57, 4
MEPCD117+, CD16/32-, CD34-, CD64-, CD127-, Sca-1-11, 60, 4, 57
NK Cell*CD11b+, CD122+, NK1.1+, NKG2D+, NKp46+58, 61
T Cell*CD3+62, 41
B Cell*B220+63
Monocyte*CD11b+, CD115+, CX3CR1+, Ly6C+64, 27, 65
Macrophage*CD45+, CD64+, F4/80+, MerTK+65, 66, 67
Dendritic Cell*CD11c+, CD24+, CD45+,      MHC II+, Siglec-F-67, 66, 30
NeutrophilCD11b+, CXCR4+, MHC II-, Gr-1+ (Ly-6G+), Siglec-F-68, 66, 69, 70, 71
EosinophilCCR3+, CD11b+, IL-5Rα+,     MHC II-, Siglec-F+34, 72, 68, 66, 71
BasophilCD41+, CD49b+, CD117-, FcεRI+73, 74, 75
Mast CellCD45+, CD117+, FcεRI+,    Integrin β7+76, 77, 78, 79
ErythrocyteTer119+80, 81
MegakaryocyteCD9+, CD41+, CD42b+, CD117+, CD150+, CXCR4+82, 83, 84, 60, 85
PlateletCD9+, CD41+, GPIa/IIa+, GPIb/V/IX+, GPVI+85, 86, 87, 88, 81

* The markers selected for these cell types are common to all subsets (eg T cell markers are common to killer, helper and regulatory T cells).

Markers are accompanied with “+” or a “–” symbol to indicate whether the specific cell type expresses (+) or lacks (-) the antigen (eg CD10+ indicates a cell type expressing CD10). In some cases, markers are accompanied with “high” or “low”, indicating different degrees of expression.

A note on lineages

Immunology research is currently progressing at an astonishing rate, and challenges to long-accepted ideas are being made with increasing frequency. We have presented the cell lineage here in the classical hierarchical format, progressing from a hematopoietic stem cell (HSC), through the various progenitors, and finally to the cells of lymphoid and myeloid lineage.

While this model remains the accepted standard, it is important to be aware that some research questions this, and some propose an alternative route of lineage development for progenitor cell. For a detailed look at the lineage development and commitment of immune cell progenitors, we suggest reviewing the excellent research in references 89, 90, and 91. However, these potential lineage adjustments do not affect the cell markers described here.

Acknowledgements

The research involved in marker selection for the poster and tables was conducted by Alessandro Rizzo, an immunologist at the Department of Veterinary Medicine, University of Cambridge, UK. Alessandro reviewed over 250 scientific papers to bring you the most up-to-date and reliable tool for immunophenotyping of immune cells in mouse and human.

References

Get here the reference list








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