All tags Epigenetics Control-Alter-Delete: Epigenetic regulation by non-coding RNAs in neuronal systems webinar

Control-Alter-Delete: Epigenetic regulation by non-coding RNAs in neuronal systems webinar

Recent evidence suggests that non-coding RNAs can interact with epigenetic modifiers to both recruit and suppress epigenetic mechanisms.

Listen in as Dr Jeremy Day, of the Department of Neurobiology at the University of Alabama at Birmingham, discusses his work exploring non-coding RNA species regulation of DNA methylation in neuronal system- including a review of some of his lab's latest unpublished data. 

59:48
59:48
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Webinar Topics:

  • An overview of activity-dependent regulations of non-coding RNAs in neurons 
  • Interactions between non-coding RNAs and DNA methyltransferases 
  • Genome-wide characterization of non-coding RNAs that arise from protein-coding genes 
  • Functional modulation of non-coding RNAs in memory formation and behavior 

About the presenter

Jeremy Day, PhD, is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Neurobiology at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. He received his PhD from the University of North Carolina in 2009 under Regina Carelli, followed by a postdoctoral fellowship with David Sweatt at UAB.

Jeremy joined the Neurobiology faculty at UAB in 2014, where his lab investigates the neurobiology of reward- related memory systems in the brain and the role of these circuits in motivated behaviours.  His research integrates molecular, physiological, behavioral, genetic and epigenetic tools to understand how experience alters epigenetic states in the brain- with specific interest in the role of non-coding RNAs within this process.  

His ultimate goal is to manipulate epigenetic or transcriptional patterns within selected neuronal populations to achieve therapeutic outcomes from the brain diseases. His work is supported by research grants from the National Institute on Drug Abuse, the Pittman Scholars Program, and by the Evelyn McKnight Brain Institute.